Monday, August 06, 2007

Crafts and Projects

June, 1852
Godey's Lady's Book
Philadelphia
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
Vol XLIV Page 508

CROCHET.- YOUNG LADY'S CUFF.

Materials.— One ounce of shaded scarlet, or violet Berlin wool, six skeins of white wool; Penelope crochet No. 2.

With white make a chain the width of the arm; unite the first loop to the last, and work ten rounds in close long stitches.

With scarlet, work one round in double crochet, and one in long stitches.

3d round.— 1 double crochet, 5 chain, miss 1; repeat.

4th round.— Chains of 5 united to the centre stitch of former round.

Work seven more rounds like 4th; then 1 round 1 double crochet in centre stitch of chain, 1 chain; repeat. Work two rounds in double crochet in every stitch; then repeat twice again from 3d round, continuing to work with colored wool. Now draw the colored part over the white, and crochet the first round of white and the last of colored together. Work one round long stitches, one round double crochet, and finish with the following.

EDGE.— 1st round.— 1 double crochet, 1 long worked in one stitch, 3 double long in one stitch, 1 long, 1 double crochet in one stitch, 5 chain, miss 2; repeat.

2d round.— 1 double in double crochet, 7 chain; repeat.



June, 1852
Godey's Lady's Book
Philadelphia
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
Vol XLIV Page 510


PATTERNS FOR SILK EMBROIDERY.


These patterns are for collars. The thick lines may be wrought with fine lines, if preferred.

June, 1852
Godey's Lady's Book
Philadelphia
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
Vol XLIV Page 508



KNITTED BERRIES AND FRUIT.


PEAR.


Four needles (No. 19) are required. Cast on six stitches on each of two needles and three on the third.

Knit one plain round with green purse twist.

Second round.— Knit one, make one, knit two, make one, knit one, make one, knit two, make one, knit one, make one, knit two, make one, knit one, make one, knit two, make one, knit one, make one.

Third and Fourth rounds.— Plain,

Fifth. round.— Knit two, make one, knit one, make one, knit four, make one, knit one, make one, knit four, make one, knit one, make one, knit four, make one, knit one, make one, knit four, make one, knit one, make one, knit two.

Sixth and Seventh rounds.— Plain.

Eighth round.— Knit three, make one, knit one, make one, knit six, make one, knit one, make one, knit six, make one, knit one, make one, knit six, make one, knit one, make one, knit six, make one, knit one, make one, knit three.

Ninth and Tenth rounds.— Plain.

Eleventh round.— Knit four, make one, knit one, make one, knit eight, make one, knit one, make one, knit eight, make one, knit one, make one, knit eight, make one, knit one, make one, knit eight, make one, knit one, make one, knit four.

Twelfth and Thirteenth rounds.- P1ain.

Fourteenth round.— Knit five, make one, knit one, make one, knit ten, make one, knit one, make one, knit ten, make one, knit one, make one, knit ten, make one, knit one, make one, knit ten, make one, knit one, make one, knit five.

Fifteenth and Sixteenth rounds.— Plain.

Seventeenth round.— Knit six, make one, knit one, make one, knit twelve, make one, knit one, make one, knit twelve, make one, knit one, make one, knit twelve, make one, knit one, make one, knit twelve, make one, knit one, make one, knit six.

Eighteenth and Nineteenth rounds.— Plain.

Twentieth round.— Knit seven, make one, knit one, make one, knit fourteen, make one, knit one, make one, knit fourteen, make one, knit one, make one, knit fourteen, make one, knit one, make one, knit fourteen, make one, knit one, make one,- knit seven.

Twelve plain rounds, then work one round; taking two stitches together on each side of the stitch which was between increases, and work thus altogether four decreasing rounds, with two plain rounds between each decreasing one; then decrease for four rounds one stitch only (by taking two together) as straight as possible, in continuation of the decreasing stripes, with three plain rounds between each decreasing one, and four more decreasing rounds, with four plain rounds between. When twelve stitches only remain (four on each needle), work six plain rounds, then one round, decreasing one stitch on each needle; two more plain rounds, and finish off by gathering the stitches. Make a stalk with a spring wire cut in two, and covered, first with cotton wool, then with brown floss on half twist silk; insert it in the narrowest end of the pear; fasten the gathered stitches as close as possible to the stalk; fill the pear with coarse bran* as firm as possible; gather the stitches of the other aperture; place a clove in it, and fasten the gathered stitches round the stalk of the clove. A leaf may be added with good effect. The pear-tree leaf is of an oval shape, and so simple, that no directions to make it will be needed by those who have worked the far more difficult oak leaves, or any other leaf.

* As the bran would soil the wool, it will be found necessary to knit a second pear, somewhat smaller, in white cotton, and insert it in the first before filling it up.